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Bidco Laborers Protest Poor Working Conditions

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Lawrence Ojok who is attached to the loading and offloading department, said their employers have failed to explain the weekly tax deductions levied against them.
Some of the workers protesting against poor working conditions.

Audio 4

More than 1000 casual laborers attached to Bidco Uganda Limited-BUL in Jinja district laid down their tools on Tuesday protesting poor working conditions.

The striking workers claimed that they are forced to work overtime without bonuses, adding that their complaints fell on deaf ears.

Jordan Isabirye, an employee in the transport department, said he has worked with BUL for the past seven years but he has never received an appointment letter, which threatens his job security.

Isabirye adds that, he demands three years over time bonuses from the factory.

 

 Vernacular Audio

//Cue in: “nga nze…  

Cue out…embi,”.

 

Lawrence Ojok who is attached to the loading and offloading department, said their employers have failed to explain the weekly tax deductions levied against them.

//cue in: “bwo’ba…  

Cue out…musolo,”.     

James Musisi from the plastic department said that they are not accorded equal employment rights like day offs and sick leaves and promotions, which has killed their morale at work.

//cue in: “ffe casual worker…

Cue out…kyeyeyagala,”.    

The administrators of Bidco Uganda Limited held a harmonization meeting with the striking employees and pleaded with them to call off their strike in vain.    

The Jinja Resident District Commissioner, Eric Sakwa who presided over the meeting, said most of the issues raised are administrative, saying the general manager has been given a period of two weeks to address them.

//Cue in: “after listening to…    

Cue out…handle those issues,”.   

Daniel Ker, the Managing Director Bidco Uganda, said a new management has taken over the factory and new policies are being introduced to suit the demands of the new directors.

He also said the factory suffers a communication gap due to lack of a human resource manager who would address employee grievances.