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Buvuma Residents Live in Fear of Landslides

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Small streams originating from higher grounds run through Bukindi village and drain into Lake Victoria, which is about 2 kilometers away.
Heavy craks developed in people's garderns.

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Residents of Bukindi village in Nairambi Sub County in Buvuma district are living in fear of landslides. 

Small streams originating from higher grounds run through Bukindi village and drain into Lake Victoria, which is about 2 kilometers away.

The streams have caused ground movement affecting about three acres of land that has triggered panic among residents as their crops including cassava, maize and pine trees have already been buried underground.  

Julius Wafuko, one of the residents who relocated from the area after noticing huge cracks, says the landslide often occurring during night hours whenever it rains. 

He wants government to send technical teams to assess the area and make recommendations to residents so as to avert disaster.

//Cue in: “Naye enkuba bwe…   

Cue out: …kyeyongedde okutambula”//

  

Moses Basalirwa, the Bukindi LC I Chairperson, says six houses and 10 gardens of maize, cassava and pine trees have already been buried. 

He says over 30 other gardens are also on the verge of being destroyed, which will compromise food security in the area.           

Luganda Audio   

 

//Cue in: “Lugenze nga lupangulukuka…

Cue out: …obulala obwetagisa”//  

Zubaili Mwogeza, another resident is scared of finding an alternative place to relocate too, saying they don’t own any other land. 

According to Mwogeza, many homesteads are on the verge of being destroyed by the moving ground but have nothing they can do unless government comes to their rescue.    

Luganda Audio    

//Cue in: “Nibanaiffe babano butimbigano…

 

Cue out: …nga kisenguka”//

  

Juma Kigongo, the Buvuma Deputy Residents District Commissioner, says he visited the area and instructed the affected residents to vacate and suspend further agricultural activities until they are advised by their technical teams.  

“It is risky to allow our people continue staying and working in the area which has already started moving and developing dangerous cracks,” Kigongo said.