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Gov’t to Support Refugees Equate their Education Papers

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Edward Ssebukyu, the Coordinator Uganda Secondary Education Extended Program-USEEP attributes the problem to the fact that many refugees haven’t been able to equate their previous educational experience to establish whether they are fit to enroll in secondary school.
One of the refugee children attending classes at Imvepi Refugee Settlement in Arua.

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The Education and Sports Ministry will start providing certification to learners who have completed their primary education outside Uganda to enable them enroll into secondary school without difficulty.

Available records indicate that the attainment of secondary school is severely lacking in refugee settlements in Uganda. Whereas 58.2 percent of refugees enroll in primary school, only 11.3 percent attend secondary school.  

Edward Ssebukyu, the Coordinator Uganda Secondary Education Extended Program-USEEP attributes the problem to the fact that many refugees haven’t been able to equate their previous educational experience to establish whether they are fit to enroll in secondary school.

  

Ssebukyu notes that oftentimes educational attainment for refugees ends after primary school, resulting in distinct impact on their ability to achieve social and economic independence. 

He says at times some of the children are forced to sit Primary Leaving Examinations to have a smooth transition, which is time-consuming and wastes resources.

He says the few that struggle to equate their documents are at times challenged by the huge sum of money asked by Uganda National Examination Board- UNEB.

 

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Now, the Education Ministry plans to set aside over Shillings 3.3 billion to cater for the challenge.  The Education Ministry Permanent Secretary, Alex Kakooza, says the fund is part of the Uganda Secondary Education Extended Program that was approved recently by the World Bank.

In the same development, the Ministry has provided Shillings 16.6 billion for capitation grants to lower public secondary schools in refugee-hosting areas that enroll refugees. The money will complement the already existing government releases to such schools.

 

Ssebukyu notes that the project will also support the refugee special needs education specifically through the accelerated education program “to provide a fast track learning opportunity to enroll in lower secondary school at the appropriate age or who dropped out of school for various reasons.”

Every year, Uganda receives thousands of refugees pushed from their countries by war and drought. Without education, the future of the children remains gloomy. However, to ensure that they get the opportunity, Uganda has decreed that the refugee children get the same education as other citizens.

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