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School Feeding Peaks in Gulu Following Bumper Harvest

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Now, Caesar Akena, the Gulu District Education Officer, says provision of midday meals to learners has improved from 68 percent in the first term to 100 percent in the second term because of the bumper harvest both in the school farm and parent’s homes.
14 Aug 2019 11:06
Pupils of St. Kizito Aywe Primary school welcoming Hon. Sam Engola, the state Minister for Defense -Photo by Jesse Johnson James

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The school feeding in Primary schools in Gulu district is at its highest following the first season bumper harvest.   The State Minister for Primary Education, Rosemary Seninde Nansubuga launched the school feeding program in Gulu district in December 2016.  

Now, Caesar Akena, the Gulu District Education Officer, says provision of midday meals to learners has improved from 68 percent in  the first term to 100 percent in the second term because of the bumper harvest both in the school farm and parent’s homes.  

According to Akena, when Gulu District came up with a compulsory school feeding program in March 2018, all the 55 UPE schools, 27 private and 8 community primary school embraced the program, something that has led to improved performance.

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Most primary schools in Gulu require parents to contribute 15Kgs of Maize flour, 9Kgs of Beans and Shillings 15,000 towards the school feeding program each term.

Akena revealed that some schools have opened their farms to supplement the little food that parents contribute.

Betty Amonding, the Headmistress St. Kizito Aywe Primary School in Gulu District, says the school feeding program is slowly picking up in her school since most of the parents either make late contributions or pay in installments.   

St. Kizito Aywe Primary School has 884 pupils but only less than 150 pupils eat lunch in school.

Livingstone Okumu Langol, a parent at the school, says he spends Shillings 150,000 on the feeding of each of his two children. He says the money carters for sugar, rice, maize flour, beans and soap.

Nutrition expert argue that providing midday meals to learners enhances their concentration levels in class hence improving their performance.