Breaking

Algeria Takes Over Uganda Police Training after North Korea Exit

Top story
The departure of North Korea follows increasing pressure on Uganda to halt its military relationship with Pyongyang, which was labeled unlawful in line with resolution 2270 of the United Nations Security Council passed.
Inspector General of Police (IGP) Kale Kayihura meets a delegation of experts from the Algerian National Police

Audio 2

The National police of Algeria have replaced North Korea in training and advising the Uganda Police specialized units. The replacement was confirmed by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between Police Chief Gen Kale Kayihura and his Algerian counterpart Abdelghani Hamel today.

The memorandum allows instructors and experts from the Algerian National Police to train and advise the specialized Units of the Uganda Police Force. They will be training the Air wing of Police, Counter terrorism, ICT, Forensics and other specialized units as well as advising on management and strategies for policing.

The training's have been facilitated by North Korean instructors since 2007. The departure of North Korea follows increasing pressure on Uganda to halt its military relationship with Pyongyang which was labeled unlawful in line with resolution 2270 of the United Nations Security Council.

The resolution prohibits countries from cooperating in the military and police sectors with North Korea and makes any form of North Korean–led police training unlawful.

A report released by the Royal United Service Institute for Defence and Security Studies in January, named Uganda among the top five countries that had defied the UN sanctions against North Korea. As a result, the UN warned Uganda among other countries to cut ties with Pyongyang.

Uganda and North Korea have been renewing their military and police cooperation agreements after every six months. However, with the latest development, all North Korean security instructors will leave the country by the end of this year, according to North Korean Ambassador to Uganda Myong Kyong Chol.

Police Chief Gen Kale Kayihura says the choice of partnering with Algeria is based on the nature of their police which has developed over the years through its own innovation and funds.

//Cue in.... "They have

Cue Out..... own problems"//


A team of experts from Algeria is currently in the country to assess the current management and capacity of the Ugandan police before a strategy meeting is held next month.  The meeting will look at the focus areas which need improvement and how best the Algerian police can help.

//Cue in...."That's why

Cue out....have reached" //

Algeria police has a manpower capacity of 200,000 police officers manning a population of 38million people.