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Apac Municipality Bans Sale of Fuel in Plastic Bottles

Geoffrey Ojuka Ekweny the directly elected councillor for Ngec ward in Arocha Division observes that petrol is highly flammable which is risky to have it being sold in open and public places.
A man fueling his motorcycle from a retail vendor

Audio 3

Apac Municipal Council authorities have banned the sale of fuel in plastic bottles.

This follows concerns raised by leaders and residents over the rampant sale of petrol in shops and at roadsides within the municipality.

The council resolved to give a six months ultimatum to people selling the fuel or close down their business or risk being arrested.

Geoffrey Ojuka Ekweny the directly elected councillor for Ngec ward in Arocha Division observes that petrol is highly flammable which is risky to have it being sold in open and public places.

“Those selling petrol in black markets should not be given space to conduct their business within the town centre since it is even illegal to give them the operation permit. If they want to continue with their business let them go and operate in villages where people are not crowded.”  He said.

Ambrose Opaka, the Apac Municipal Council Chairperson Production and Marketing argued that the ban is long overdue. He says that coupled with the risk factors associated with fuel, those selling the fuel do not pay revenue to the council.

“Am calling for the intervention of the council over this matter since many people are now joining this business yet they are not paying any revenue to us,” he said.

However, Anthony Ocen, a retail dealer in petrol argued that it is unfair for them to have their businesses closed since it is their source of livelihood.

//Cue in: “Aman icawani atye…

Cue out: …  niyang wa iye.”//

Translation: “As of now, I am hearing information that they have given us a small time to stop selling petrol within the town yet it is our business. How do they want us to survive? What advice do they have for us? We are not happy because this interrupts our business which is our only source of livelihood.”

Benson Toga, another retail petrol dealer says nothing will stop him from selling petrol unless the authorities provide them with alternative businesses.

//Cue in: “Cunya pe tye…

Cue out: … Moyo apir wa.”//

Nelson Otile, a resident of the municipality argues that banning such business will lead to an increase in crime rates since the retailers will have lost their source of livelihood and resort to criminal acts to earn a living.

//Cue in: “banning such a business…

Cue out: … dangers of such.”//