Warning: Trying to access array offset on value of type bool in /usr/www/users/urnnet/a/story.php on line 43
Bukalasa Lecturer Advocates for Resource, Facility Sharing Among Neighboring Schools :: Uganda Radionetwork
Breaking

Bukalasa Lecturer Advocates for Resource, Facility Sharing Among Neighboring Schools

Joseph Sserwanga, the Deputy Principal of Bukalasa Agricultural College has expressed concern that both government and private investors find it challenging to afford the necessary resources for each school, and highlighted the critical shortage of resources like land, sports facilities, and laboratories, which are essential for effective learning.
07 Feb 2024 12:22
The 1992 Government White Paper
The government has been urged to adopt a systematic approach to resource sharing and collaboration among schools in order to address the resource, facility and equipment challenges facing educational institutions.

Joseph Sserwanga, the Deputy Principal of Bukalasa Agricultural College has expressed concern that both government and private investors find it challenging to afford the necessary resources for each school, and highlighted the critical shortage of resources like land, sports facilities, and laboratories, which are essential for effective learning.

"If the government cannot provide each school with the necessary resources, the best way to ensure quality education for all is to establish common facilities for schools in the same locality," Sserwanga asserted during an interaction with the Education Policy Review Commission.

He specifically pointed to the challenges faced by schools in teaching agriculture and providing sports facilities. He noted that with land becoming a contentious resource, not all schools can afford to build sports facilities for various sports and games. Moreover, schools with available land may lack the funds for such investments.

"It's concerning to see schools shying away from crucial subjects like sports, science, ICT, and agriculture when a significant percentage of Ugandans are actively engaged. The challenges of associated costs, lack of equipment, and a shortage of technicians must be addressed for a more holistic education system," he added.

Sserwanga proposed the creation of shared sports complexes in designated areas, accessible to both private and public schools. He argued that this approach would be a more viable option than investing heavily in individual school facilities adding that a consistent standard of education across schools, would ensure that every student has access to essential facilities and qualified teachers and instructors.

The same principle, he suggested, could be applied to agriculture, where a shared facility, modeled after Bukalasa College, could offer neighbouring schools the opportunity to explore different aspects of agricultural education. In addition to serving schools, the deputy principal emphasized that these shared facilities could also support and employ additional skills for Ugandans outside the school system.

"Sports enthusiasts could use the facilities to enhance their skills, while those involved in agriculture can utilize the common facilities for training local farmers, disseminating new technologies, and acquiring relevant skills beyond the classroom," he added.

Highlighting that this approach has already been successfully implemented by several other countries, Sserwanga urged the commission to consider its effectiveness in addressing resource disparities and enhancing the overall quality of education in Uganda.

Sserwanga's proposition is also found in England and Wales, where concepts like School Federations allow various schools, including voluntary-aided, foundation schools, and maintained school nurseries, to unite under a single governing body. This collaborative approach enables schools to pool resources, expertise, and staff, granting smaller institutions access to facilities and programs that may be financially challenging individually.

India, too, has embraced collaborative educational frameworks, as evident in the Scheme of Kendriya Vidyalayas (Central Schools) established in 1962. This network of centrally funded schools ensures standardized quality education across diverse regions by sharing common facilities like libraries, laboratories, and playgrounds. 

The National Planning Authority has echoed a similar sentiment, emphasizing the importance of collaboration in the education sector. However, their proposal places a strong emphasis on governance, advocating for the establishment of School Cluster Boards of Governors.

The Education Policy Review Commission (EPRC), chaired by Nuwe Amanya Mushega, was established by the Education Minister in 2021. Its primary mandate is to develop a new comprehensive policy framework for education and sports in Uganda. This framework is intended to replace the existing Government White Paper on Education from 1992. Fundamentally, the commission is tasked with guiding and enhancing the education system for overall improvement.

Support us


Images 1