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Bundibugyo Teachers Join WhatsApp Groups To Share New Teaching Guides

Silver Kyomuhendo, a science teacher at the government aided Bubukwanga secondary school in Bubukwanga Sub County, explains that her school hasn’t received some teaching guide and materials like text books from the Ministry as planned. She says to resolve this problem they have been forced to start WhatsApp where they can share the material.
A teacher and Students attending to thier Science Labaratory at Three little Angel SS

Audio 5

Teachers in Bundibugyo District have resorted to forming WhatsApp groups so as to access the new curriculum teaching guide. Early last month, the National Curriculum Development Centre (NCDC) issued a list of new textbooks and Teacher’s Guides for different subjects following the introduction of the reviesed Lower Secondary Curriculum, which begun with Senior One students this year.   

However, several schools are yet to access the materials for both learners and teachers given limited resources. Sliver Kyomuhendo, a science teacher at the government aided Bubukwanga secondary school in Bubukwanga Sub County, explains that her school hasn’t received some teaching guide and materials like text books from the Ministry as planned.

She says to resolve this problem they have been forced to start WhatsApp where they can share the material.

  

 

//Cue in: “We formed WhatsApp groups…   

Cue out: …must work together.”//   

Happy Johnson, a private teacher at Bubukwanga secondary school told URN that many schools in the district don’t have the teaching guides, textbooks and assessment frameworks. He says this prompted him to join a teacher’s WhatsApp group to access some needed teaching information. 

Johnson explains that although the resources are online, many teachers can’t access them since some schools don’t own a single computer to ease their work.    

//Cue in: “It was running only… 

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He however, says the option of using social media hasn’t come without costs to them given their little pay. Johnson explains that on average he uses 2200 from his retail shop to pay for data and OTT. 

Rogers Lyahinda, a teacher of Agriculture and master trainer at Three little Angels in Ntandi Town Council, says despite the fact that he appreciates the new curriculum, they have failed to access material for teachers and learners.  

Like others teachers Lyahinda, says he usually gets teaching guides and guidance from other teachers through social media platforms.     

//Cue in: “We are still lacking… 

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He says this doesn’t only cost them money, but it also prolongs the teaching time since teachers spend hours inquiring from friends.     

//Cue in: “Mmust be having a cost…    

Cue out:…Eighty or seventy.”// 

Another teacher who only identified himself as Enock from Bundikahungu Seed Secondary School in Nyahuka Town Council Sub County says he faced difficulties to access teaching guides for physics since he has no smart phone. He currently teaches using old methods. 

 

"Government told us to use whatever we have to implement this new program that means the learning process must continue," Enock notes. Bright Bwamale, the head of Science Department at Three Little Angels, says apart from teachers improvising ways to access information, some go further to improvise learning aids including using manila papers. 

He says schools lack budgets, which can handle such expenses. He also notes that some teachers don’t have access to smart phones, which forces them to either abandon classes or still use the old methods of teaching.

//Cue in: “Especially those who…. 

Cue out: … very many students.”// 

  

At Burambagira Secondary School in Ngamba Sub County, the situation is no different for science teachers. 

A teacher, who spoke to URN r on condition of anonymity, said she has been unable to access teaching guides.  She said she has skipped some classes because of failure to access the materials.   

 

Anthony Balyebulya, the head teacher Bubukwanga SS, says they are yet to receive the required teaching materials from the Ministry.  Though teachers have been finding resources through various means, Balyebulya says this method isn’t sustainable. 

Geoffrey Namisi, a national trainer on the new curriculum and the coordinator for SESMAT from Ministry of Education, says the ministry is still committed to provide more teaching and learning materials to school. Dr. Grace Birungi Baguma, the Director the National Curriculum Development Centre-NCDC appreciates the challenges the teachers are facing, saying efforts are on to bridge the existing gaps.