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Buvuma Residents Appeal to Gov't Over Nairobi Fly

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Susan Nankanja, a Village Health Team-VHT member, says many residents wake up from their beds in the morning with itchy faces, which sometimes develop into blisters. She is distressed that many of them are suffering with pain due to failure to access treatment.
A child at Lwajje sub county in Buvuma district with blisters caused by the Nairobi fly.

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Residents of Lwajje Sub County in Buvuma District have crowd out for government intervention to combat the Nairobi fly. 

The fly, which is also known as Kenyan flies, is a rove black and red beetle of about 6–10 mm long. The fly lives in rotting leaves where it lays eggs and multiplies mainly during heavy rains and is common around water catchment areas.  

The fly doesn’t sting or bite but its haemolymph contains a corrosive substance known as pederin, a potent toxin that causes blistering once released on the body. 

Residents of Lwajje, which is isolated island from the main island, say the number of people affected by the blisters resulting from the Nairobi fly has increased. 

Susan Nankanja, a Village Health Team-VHT member, says many residents wake up from their beds in the morning with itchy faces, which sometimes develop into blisters. 

She is distressed that many of them are suffering with pain due to failure to access treatment.  

Luganda Byte.     

//Cue in: “Naye tetulina daggala…

Cue out: …omuwulira omuliro”//  

Charles Ogudu, another resident says the insects find their way into their houses at night and stick on the walls. 

He explains that once touches the insect it releases itch water, which causes blisters once one touches their body.  

Luganda Byte.    

//Cue in: “Akawuka ako…       

Cue out: …obulumi bungi nyo”//  

Dr Barker Kanyike, the Buvuma District Health Officer-DHO confirms the presence of the insects, saying they have registered about 30 cases of patients with blisters in a period of one year caused by the Nairobi fly. 

“We know about these insects in the area but the good thing is that they are still in one Sub County. I have discussed the matter with the district environment department to find a possible solution and notified the Health Ministry about the need for medication,” Kanyike explains. 

He appeals to residents to improve the sanitation and hygiene around their homes, saying they are the main reason why the insects get in people’s homes. 

Dr. Kanyike advises residents to gently brush the beetles from their bodies to avoid irritation.