Breaking

Crane Performers; The Troupe that Lit the 'Walk of Fame' for New MPs

From West Nile sounds of Agwara mainly from the Kebu and lugbara people, to Northern Uganda’s Yoo- leng gospel song, Western Uganda’s Ndyamuhaki and the famous gospel tune Tukutendereze, and songs from the East Like Emali, Mwanawamberi in Samia among others, the crane performers left their mark following their outstanding show whenever each of the 529 MPs stepped to the podium.
Crane performers dance during the swearing in ceremony. Photo by Olive Nakatudde

Audio 9

For at least four days over the last one week, crane performers lit up the stage at the Parliament, adding thrill and colour to the swearing-in ceremony of members of the eleventh parliament.

From West Nile sounds of Agwara mainly from the Kebu and lugbara people, to Northern Uganda’s Yoo- leng gospel song, Western Uganda’s Ndyamuhaki and the famous gospel tune Tukutendereze, and songs from the East Like Emali, Mwanawamberi in Samia among others, the crane performers left their mark following their outstanding show whenever each of the 529 MPs stepped to the podium.   

They genially performed and left the MPs pulling rear dance strokes, sometimes swiftly adjusting to the taste of each MP. The team ululated and jubilated for the MPs entourage, even when some of them appeared cold or preserved, they lifted their spirits by dancing and moving gracefully in different patterns as they performed.

The fascinating beauty of their performance came in their ability to play songs that matched with the dialect from the home area of each of the MP. Even for the unique constituencies, like the army, crane performers pulled off the liberation signs. The walk to the podium was beautified by the sounds and the choreography. 

Some of the were requested for by the MPs,' while for those who made no choice, songs were played based on which part of the country they come from, or the language they speak. Several of them were customised with the name of the MP who was taking the 'walk of fame.'  This was accompanied by instruments like the single-skin drums (Engalabi), calabash, and local xylophone among others.         

Gordon Kayovu, the Director of Crane performers says that they were elated every time they saw MP's moved by their tunes. He says that the fact that they are from various parts of the country and have mastered the songs and performance, this was more of an experience and not a job.

//Cue in;  “Especially the members...    

Cue out:…be the glory”//     

He says unity and love makes the team tick. 

    

//Cue in; “You see the…   

Cue out…that particular person.”//         

Kayovu says that they ensured that they do not sing political songs, and were also mindful of the atmosphere, But the most exciting moment for them were the moves by Godfrey Atiku, also known as Papa Wemba who escorted Ayivu East MP Geoffrey Feta to the swearing-in ceremony. Papa Wemba, dressed in a trouser close to his chest with two belts danced to the tunes of Olonge from Alur sending the house into a frenzy.  

//Cue in; “The most exciting…  

Cue out…the Agwara yes”//   

But there were a few challenges, and one of them came with the entry of Makindye East MP Derrick Nyeko, a Japadhola by tribe, raised in Kampala and now representing a constituency in Buganda. Kayovu said at some point they didn’t know whether to play a Jophadola song or traditional kiganda song since Nyeko has often identified himself as a son of Buganda.     

Such a mix up was also seen when Geoffrey Ekanya, the MP of Tororo North requested a Jopadhola song, yet they had prepared a special song for him from Teso. But even then, they were able to adjust so fast and give the MP a grand entry on a song of his choice.

//Cue in: “At first we… 

Cue out:…. what he wants”//    

Julius Tusiime Karuhanga the MP Rwampara East says he was amazed and how beautiful the crane performers played. 

//Cue in; “I want to… 

Cue out….meaning to me.”//      

Images 1

Keywords

Entities