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Eight Agago Civil Servants in Trouble For Engaging in Partisan Politics

Agago District Chief Administrative Officer, Fred Kalyesubula has tasked the implicated officers for an explanation on their involvement in partisan politics.
A letter authored by the Agago CAO demanding explanations from civilservant over politicking Photo by Dan M Komakech (2)

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Eight civil servants in Agago district are in trouble for their alleged involvement in partisan politics in their line of duty.

They are Patrick Lapok, a teacher attached to Lira Palwo Senior Secondary School, Deogratuis Deodato Menya, the Senior Assistant Secretary for Omiya Pachua Sub County, Geoffrey Olweny, a health worker at Otumpili health center II and another only identified as Jack, a teacher of Ngora P7 School. 

Others include a Sub County Community Development Officer and three primary school teachers whose particulars were not readily available by the time of publishing this story.

Agago District Chief Administrative Officer, Fred Kalyesubula has tasked the implicated officers for an explanation on their involvement in partisan politics.  

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Kalyesubula says the matter came to the limelight following numerous complaints from the public against the civil servants who are being accused of politicking instead of rendering services required of them.

He has cautioned civil servants against engaging in partisan politics, saying any breach of the foregoing warnings will result in sanctions.

Agago District LC V Chairperson, Leonard Ojok condemned the conduct of the civil servant, saying they are expected to work in accordance with civil service regulations.

He says such conduct compromises the confidence of  the public in civil servants and asked them to exercise professionalism and serve their communities without bias. 

Luo Audio

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Section F-p (3) of the Public Service Standing Orders 2010 stipulates that once a public officer wishes to contest for a position in a political party, he or she is required to retire in accordance with the Pension Act or resign from the Public service. 

The order further states that any staff of the service who wishes to engage in politics, must resign and join the private sector where there would be no limitation on their political activities.

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