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Evicted Encroachers Benefit from Wetland Restoration Project in Rwampara

This is part of the Integrated Water Resources Management Project which is targeting 1,000 households to directly benefit from the new livelihood changing projects under the plan for the Restoration and Protection of the River Rwizi Ecosystem and Catchment Area.
The cheque that is worth 100 million shillings was handed over to the thirty groups that wre evicted from the wetlands in Rwampara district

Audio 6

600 People who were evicted and those who voluntarily moved out of wetlands in Rwampara district are set to benefit from a 100 million Shillings wetland restoration project.

This is part of the Integrated Water Resources Management Project which is targeting 1,000 households to directly benefit from the new livelihood changing projects under the plan for the Restoration and Protection of the River Rwizi Ecosystem and Catchment Area. The beneficiaries will be given pigs, goats, tree seedlings, and beehives to engage in meaningful activities other than practising agriculture in wetlands.

This follows a forceful eviction operation conducted last month by the National Environment Management Authority-NEMA and the office of the Resident District Commissioner against individuals who had encroached on the Ihoho-Kongoro -Nyakaikara -Kijojo wetland catchment. Those  evicted are residents of three parishes of Kongoro, Nyakaikara and Ihoho in Bugamba and Ndeija Sub counties, with a catchment area covering  150 hectares.

Arinaitwe Humprey, one of the beneficiaries says the wetland that had existed for over 40 years had been degraded within three years by encroachers noting that through the project they were sensitized about the bad effects of encroaching on wetlands. Similarly, Annet Ninsiima, another beneficiary says they were sensitized about the good methods of farming without encroaching on wetlands.

//Cue in; “nyowe nahisyamu emyaka…

Cue out…community yoona ebiganyirwemu.”//

//Cue in; “batushoborora kutukushisha ebyobuhangwa…

Cue out…ebyokushisha ebyobuhagwa twabireka.”//

John Najuna, the chairperson of ACORD, a local non-government organisation, wants the government to give evicted people alternative livelihoods to stop them from returning to the wetland. He says they are focusing on doing projects outside the wetlands like beekeeping, piggery, and doing backyard gardens

//Cue in; “giving out a…

Cue out…mostly the wetlands.”//

The project implemented by Rwampara District Local Government is spearheaded by the Agency for Cooperation in Research and Development Southwestern Uganda and funded by Bread for the World, a Germany based development agency.

Rwampara District Chairperson Richard Womugasho says that the project seeks to restore the wetlands for future generations. He warned the heads of the environment and natural resources departments not to allow again the encroachment and degrading of the wetlands.

//Cue in; “is when we…

Cue out…once for all.”//

Emmy Katera Turyabagyenyi, Resident District commissioner asked the beneficiaries to make good use of the project to sustain their livelihood without encroaching again on the wetlands.

//Cue in; “they have handed…

Cue out...degrade the wetland.”//

Joconiuos Musingwire the regional manager of NEMA western Uganda welcomed the project and asked the beneficiaries to always look out for the indicators of the wetland especially during the dry season to avoid unnecessary excuses.

//Cue in; “The appeal is…

Cue out: …that has resurfaced.”//

According to the auditor general’s report 2018 wetlands in Uganda have declined from about 13% in 1994 to 8.9 per cent in 2017 which has led to the occurrences of negative consequences such as floods, prolonged dry seasons, loss of Biodiversity and deteriorating water quality.