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Tororo School Excludes Indians from Measles-Rubella Immunization

Oyuka reportedly locked up children in classrooms to prevent them from receiving the vaccines as part of the mass measles-rubella vaccination campaign that started today, in schools across the country. He said that the school needed to seek consent from the parents before subjecting its pupils to any kind of vaccination.
A disagreement has ensued between Tororo Resident District Commissioner Yahaya Were and the headteacher of Little George Junior school Brian Oyuka, over the immunization of children from Indian families.  

Oyuka reportedly locked up children in classrooms to prevent them from receiving the vaccines as part of the mass measles-rubella vaccination campaign that started today, in schools across the country.  He said that the school needed to seek consent from the parents before subjecting its pupils to any kind of vaccination. 

The RDC stormed the school as soon as he leant that the Indian community had been excluded from the campaign.  But in his explanation, Brian Oyuka said he could not present children whose parents were against the immunization program.

After more than 30 minutes of arguing, Were called the leader of the Indian community in Tororo district Brij Gagarani to clarify their position on the campaign.   He also asked the police to investigate the reason behind the head teacher’s actions. 

He said that any attempt to block the vaccination tantamount to sabotaging government programmes adding that all schools regardless of their foundation or background, were required to be part of the campaign.   

//Cue in; "We are monitoring 

Cue out…all the family members.”// 

It is said that the district had earlier on written to the Indian community informing them about the immunization process and asking them to allow their children to be vaccinated.      

Prior to the scuffle, an Indian parent identified as Moham Bhodice had presented documents indicating that his child was immunized from India in May and did not require another round of vaccination against measles and rubella. 

The five-day mass immunization campaign, funded by the Government of Uganda; GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance; the United Nations Children’s Fund; and the World Health Organization (WHO) started today, as one of the government's effort to tackle Measles, Rubella and Polio. It is targeting 18 million children. 

The campaign, to be conducted in schools for the first three days and in communities for the last two days, targets all children younger than 15 years, whether previously immunized or not, in order to interrupt the circulation of the three diseases. The campaign will also be a Launchpad for the Measles-Rubella Vaccine into the country’s routine immunization schedule. 

Uganda has experienced measles outbreaks across numerous districts in the past three years.