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Former Moroto High Students Want School Revamped

John Nangiro, the LC5 Chairperson Nakapiripirit, also an old student of Moroto High School says more needs to be done to reclaim the lost glory of the school. Nangiro attributes poor academic performance to insecurity, which he notes forced many good teachers out of the school.
Moroto High School compound with the school bus donated by the president recently.

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Old students of Moroto High school want the school revamped to its former glory.

The students have demanded that the Ministry of Education and Sports to transfer teachers who have overstayed in the school and improve the school infrastructure.

Their demand follows the poor academic performance recorded in the school over the years. A number of old students including parents and leaders in Karamoja have raised concern over the performance of the school.

In last year's Uganda Certificate of Education, UCE examinations, majority of the candidates obtained fourth grade, the same performance reflected almost in all the years since 2005.

Last week, the students demanded the head teacher, Fr. John Bosco Kutegena transferred alongside several teachers that have overstayed in Moroto.

Godfrey Angella, an old student says he is surprised to see a number of his teachers still in the same school. Angella, who studied at Moroto High School between 2001 and 2006, says that teachers who have overstayed have frustrated efforts for improvement.

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John Nangiro, the LC5 Chairperson Nakapiripirit, also an old student of Moroto High School says more needs to be done to reclaim the lost glory of the school. Nangiro attributes poor academic performance to insecurity, which he notes forced many good teachers out of the school.

“There is all the reason to get worried about poor performance at Moroto High School. In the 1980s, this place was insecure. Most of our good teachers left because of fear of their lives. Besides, most teachers fear this side because there are no other avenues of earning money. But all this has a solution in transfer of these teachers who have overstayed in the school” he said.

Michael Lotee, one of the parents at Moroto High School says he is discouraged by the performance of the school; not only in academics but also in sports.

“As parents, our hope is in our children but the confidence that we get for their future relies on the performance of the school. The Moroto you hear today makes me sick but what can I do as a single parent?” he said.

However, Fr. John Bosco Kutegena, the head teacher says Moroto High School is grappling with a number of challenges that include lack of teachers' motivation, unfriendly learning environment and lack of parental support.

He notes that while the school charges 300,000 shillings as school fees many students default, affecting teachers' welfare especially those paid by parents' contribution.

“The issue of teacher transfers isn't anything big but we must first deal with the environment here. The attitude of students here is very negative towards education; you must force a child to be in class and read books. Most of our students joined with weak grades but we try all we can to teach them under very hard conditions. Even books for a student are sometimes a challenge to parents, then you wonder how a teacher can help such a student excel”, he said. 

Ambrose Lotuke, the Kotido District Chairperson says the school needs to be revamped with both human resource and infrastructure. 

Although the school benefited from Irish Aid infrastructure development program in 2015 and 2016 buildings at Moroto High School require serious renovation.

Moroto High School was founded in 1965 and is the only government school in Moroto with an Advanced level.