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Health Workers in Jinja Trained in Prevention of NCDs

Health workers were tipped on rallying their clients to exercise at least four times a week to minimize the risk of acquiring NCDs.
The bishop of Busoga diocese, Rt. Rev. Paul Naimanhe (with microphone) flags off the trainees.

Audio 2

The Uganda Protestant Medical Bureau- UPMB and healthy heart Africa-HHA, have trained 35 health workers in the management and prevention of non-communicable diseases at lower health facilities in Jinja District.

In a five day training concluded at the Jinja Civil Service College on Friday, health workers were tipped on rallying their clients to exercise at least four times a week to minimize the risk of acquiring NCDs. 

James Mwesigwa, the project manager of UPMB-HHA partnership says that the two-year project involves continuous monitoring on the progress of NCDs management in over 35 health facilities from the districts of Mukono, Buikwe, Jinja, Iganga and Kamuli. 

He notes that most health workers lack the requisite skills to handle NCD patients and refresher courses are inevitable to reawaken them. 

Mwesigwa further says that the project also involves the distribution of free NCDs screening machines to promote free community screening which will ease early detection and treatment of NCDs. 

//cue in: “in this project…

Cue out…giving height meters,”. 

Mwesigwa adds that their research indicates that, 70% of the hypertensive patients fail to access treatment due to lack of funds to purchase drugs, however, the project involves offering low-cost quality medicines to all NCD patients diagnosed from the project beneficiary health facilities. 

//cue in: “once we get…

Cue out…medicines are available,”// 

Meanwhile, Moses Lyagoba, the Kamuli Assistant District Health Officer in charge of maternal and child health says that NCDs’ treatment and prevention are less prioritized in lower health facilities which creates a backlog on the region’s regional referral hospital which in turn results into high fatality rates.

According to the ministry of health survey conducted in 2014, 33% of deaths recorded in all health facilities throughout the country resulted from NCDs however, screening levels remain low among potential victims.