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ICC Marks 15 Years Of Existence :: Uganda Radionetwork
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ICC Marks 15 Years Of Existence

The International Criminal Court ICC is celebrating 15 years of the Rome Statute, its founding treaty today. The Court is inviting people around the world to tell their stories about being 15, and how events in their youth shaped their sense of justice.
The International Criminal Court (ICC) is celebrating 15 years of the Rome Statute, its founding treaty today.

The Court is inviting people around the world to tell their stories about being 15, and how events in their youth shaped their sense of justice.

The online campaign aims to engage with a broad community of those for whom justice matters, celebrate achievements thus far, and look to the future to build a more just world.

A statement issued by Fadi El Abdallah, ICC spokesperson and head of Public Affairs Unit, says the campaign will run on various platforms including the Court's website, Facebook, Twitter as well as its YouTube, Tumblr and Flickr sites until the Day of International Criminal Justice on 17 July 2017.

Participants worldwide are invited to submit a video of them reflecting on “#wheniwas15”, what shaped their sense of justice and what their hope is for the future. Alternatively, participants can post a photo of themselves, now or at the age of 15, along with their story.

President of the International Criminal Court, Silvia Fernandez de Gurmendi, says when she was 15, justice was essentially about retribution, about dispensing rewards or punishment, giving to each one what they deserved.

“Today, justice for me is just not only about retribution, it is about protection, it is about protecting those who have suffered, contributing to preventing violence against them and, when you cannot prevent, trying to remedy the harm they have suffered,” she said.

Significant influence of the ICC in Uganda began shortly after it issued warrants of arrest for five senior commanders of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) in 2005 for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

The commanders included Raska Lukwiya, LRA Leader Joseph Kony and his deputy Vincent Otti, Okot Odhiambo and Dominic Ongwen.

Ongwen is now standing trial at the court while Raska Lukwiya and Okot Odhiambo were killed in battles with troops of the Uganda People's Defence Forces (UPDF). The Court is seeking evidence that Vincent Otti was also killed in October 2007 on the orders of Joseph Kony who remains elusive.

On July 17, 1998, at a conference in Rome, 120 States adopted a treaty, known as the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. For the first time, States created a permanent international criminal court to prosecute the perpetrators of the most serious crimes, namely war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

On July 1, 2002, upon ratification by 60 States, the treaty entered into force formally establishing the International Criminal Court.

Today 124 States, including Uganda, are parties to the Rome Statute, striving to build a more just world. 

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