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ICC Convicts to Serve Sentences in Norway :: Uganda Radionetwork
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ICC Convicts to Serve Sentences in Norway

Currently, Mali is the only African country among the nine that have ratified the agreement on enforcement of sentences on conviction for Genocide, war crimes and crimes against Humanity. The others are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Serbia and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
ICC President Judge Silvia Fernández and H.E. Ambassador Anniken Krutnes signing an enforcement agreement at a ceremony held at the seat of the ICC in The Hague
Norway has become the latest state party of the International Criminal Court to accept imprisonment of convicts of the court within its territory.

Norway signed an agreement on the enforcement of sentences with the court at its seat in The Hague last evening. Under the agreement, persons convicted by the ICC may serve their sentences of imprisonment in Norway, if so decided by the Court and accepted by Norway.

Currently, Mali is the only African country among the nine that have ratified the agreement on enforcement of sentences on conviction for Genocide, war crimes and crimes against Humanity. The others are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Serbia and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the ICC, provides that sentences of imprisonment imposed by the ICC “shall be served in a State designated by the Court from a list of States which have indicated their willingness to accept sentenced persons”.

Judge Silvia Fernández, President of International Criminal Court said "The enforcement of sentences of imprisonment is a crucial element of a well-functioning and complete criminal justice system."

Highlighting that the signature of the agreement coincides with a steady increase in trial activity at the Court, President Fernández added that “now is the time for the court and States Parties to work closely together to ensure the smooth enforcement of sentences of imprisonment in the future.”

Anniken Krutnes, Norwegian Ambassador to the Netherlands, signed the agreement on behalf of Norway.

Former Lord's Resistance Army Commander Dominic Ongwen is the first Ugandan facing trial for 70 counts of sexual and gender based crimes, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Until Uganda, a State party of The Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the International Criminal Court (ICC) ratifies the agreement on enforcement of imprisonment; Ongwen has no chance of serving his jail term at home, if convicted.

The treaty provides that sentences of imprisonment imposed by the ICC "shall be served in a State designated by the Court from a list of States which have indicated to the Court their willingness to accept sentenced persons."