Breaking

Kampala's Halls Remain Closed During Exams

Two major examination halls in Kampala remained closed during the national examination season as no paper was administered there. Today morning, as Senior Six candidates countrywide were sitting for Literature Paper I and Physics Practicals, both examination halls managed were locked.
Sharing Hall Nsambya was closed today as senior six candidates in other examination centres were doing Literature Paper I and Physics Practicals.

Audio 1

Two major examination halls in Kampala remained closed during the national examination season as no paper was administered there.

 

Today morning, as Senior Six candidates countrywide were sitting for Literature Paper I and Physics Practicals, both examination halls managed were locked.

 

One of the halls is managed by the Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA).

 

All major towns in Uganda operate examination halls, as an alternative venue for candidates who are not enrolled or registered with schools in the mainstream but wish to sit for national examinations. According to the national examinations regulator—UNEB, these halls provide a safe haven for adults under the adult education school program who want to acquire either Uganda Certificate of Education (UCE) or Ugandan Advanced Certificate of Education (UACE).

 

Peter Kaujju, the KCCA publicist says that they did not administer examinations because no interested party approached them to register at the centre.

 

//Cue in; "Like it happens…

Cue out…applications for registration."//

 

Kaujju says that normally the interested individuals or institutions approach KCCA to be registered to sit exams at the centre. The centre normally has at least 50 students sitting their examinations.

 

According to UNEB, there are more than 20 examination halls in the country, one hall being present in at least every major town. Only Kampala has two centre.

 

Winnie Akampurira, an administrator at Sharing Youth Centre, Nsambya says they were forced to close the centre two years ago after the number of students declined.

 

"We stopped administering UNEB exams in 2015 because we could not compete with other schools that had the ability to set up school laboratories for O' Level examinations," she said.

 

Akampurira explains that when science subjects were made compulsory at O'level, most candidates who used to sit their examinations at Sharing Hall moved to schools in the mainstream that can offer laboratory services for practical subjects.

 

Nsambya Hall used to host up to 200 students for both UCE and UACE examinations.

 

Adult Education centres that used to rely on the services of either Lugogo or Nsambya today are forced to register their candidates in nearby schools.

 

Charles Mazinga, an administrator Fides Education Services, says that this year with a total of 40 candidates for both O and A level, they were forced to register their candidates at neighbouring schools. "Before our candidates were taught at our facilities and would sit for exams across at the examination hall. But with both Lugogo and Nsambya not functional, we had to register them at schools nearby," Mazinga said.

 

Candidates from Fines Education Services were registered at Apas Secondary School, Pearl Africa schools and Premier High School Massajja. Mazinga says that this arrangement presents his candidates with the challenge of high fees.

 

"When we used to sit at UNEB registered halls, our candidates used to pay only the required UNEB examination fee. Today, at these schools, they are paying whatever the schools want them to pay. This time round they paid 200,000 shillings to be able to sit their examinations at these schools," he explained.

Images 1

Entities

Keywords