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Kigezi Diocese Bans “Enturire” Consumption Among the Clergy

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Rt. Rev. George Bagamuhunda, the Bishop Kigezi diocese says the synod has condemned the consumption of the drink since it has become a challenge to the church.
Enturire in a cup

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Kigezi Diocese has banned the clergy from taking "Enturire", a locally fermented drink produced from sorghum. 

Enturire has been popular at church functions such as parties, weddings and birthdays since the Anglican clergy don't consume any alcoholic brands.

Rt. Rev. George Bagamuhunda, the Bishop Kigezi diocese says the synod has condemned the consumption of the drink since it has become a challenge to the church.

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He however, didn't divulge details of what could have informed the decision of the synod to condemn drink. However, an Anglican priest who spoke to URN on condition of anonymity says they may not heed to the ban on the consumption of the drink. 

He however, admits that some priests get intoxicated after taking the drink especially if it is fermented for long.

Making of Enturire.

Enturire is made from Sorghum, which is soaked for at least 24 hours. It is thereafter mixed with ash and kept for about three days before it is dried to become black sweet sorghum. Once the Sorghum is dry, it is grinded to make flour that is used for making ordinary porridge known as (Bushera). 

The Bushera is left to ferment for three days before it is mixed with honey. After the three days the Bushera is mixed with unfiltered honey (honey with the wax) and kept for between 3-5days days before it is ready for consumption. Enturire doesn't require any alcohol as the more days it spends, the more potent it becomes.

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