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Lamwo Farming Communities Fail to Adhere to Anti Retro-viral Drugs

Dr. Dennis Ochula Omoya, the in charge Padibe Health Sub district says the practice is very common in Lamwo district, which he says affects their efforts to reduce the spread of the disease due to unfaithfulness among the farming communities.
Medical workers in Lamwo district say they face an uphill task in getting Persons Living with HIV/AIDS-PLHAs to adhere to treatment. They claim farmers skip hospital to attend to their gardens in remote villages only to return back to health centers with extremely high viral loads as a result of missing their ARVs for a very long time.

 

Dr. Dennis Ochula Omoya, the in charge Padibe Health Sub district says the practice is very common in Lamwo district, which he says affects their efforts to reduce the spread of the disease due to unfaithfulness among the farming communities. Suzan Kilama Anyonomac, the Chairperson Lamwo District Forum for Persons Living with HIV/Aids blames the problem on poverty amongst the farming communities.

 

She says farmers are unable to raise enough transport money to and from the treatment centers as needed. Anyonomac claims that sometimes, the six treatment centers in the district are overwhelmed by the high numbers of patients. There are 5,008 people on ARVs in Lamwo district, most of them women. Dr. Omoya says the trend is an indication that women are more conscious of their health compared to men.  

He says the district in collaboration with development partners have embarked on community outreach programs to try and bring down the HIV prevalence rate, which he says is too high in Palabek and Kal Sub Counties for the last three consecutive years. James Otto, the LC3 Chairperson Palabek Kal Sub County says farmers in his constituency no longer treat messages on HIV/AIDS seriously. He proposes the use of mobile Clinics to reach out to the farming communities. 

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