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DPP: Blood Compensation Crippling Prosecution of Murder Cases

According to the DPP, the practice of Blood Compensation is crippling the prosecution of murder cases. Now, the DPP is pondering engaging Lango Cultural leaders on the practice, which they say is dangerous on the administration of justice in the region.

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The Directorate of Public Prosecution-DPP is decrying the practice of blood compensation in Lango Sub region. 'Blood Compensation' alias Culu-Kwor in Luo is a practice in Lango where a person accused of murder compensates the clan of the deceased usually six or more cows as a sign of seeking forgiveness and reconciliation.

 

Once the payment is accepted and completed, the clan of the deceased writes an additional statement withdrawing interest in the case. According to the DPP, the practice of 'Blood Compensation' is crippling the prosecution of murder cases. Now, the DPP is pondering engaging Lango Cultural leaders on the practice, which they say is dangerous on the administration of justice in the region.

Rukundo Martin, the Lango Regional Officer in the Directorate of Public Prosecution, says the practice has crippled prosecutions of many cases as the state is often left without any prosecution witnesses. According to Rukundo, in some instance witnesses run away they are persuaded by the state to appear in court.

Jane Okuo Kajuga, the DPP spokesperson wants court to pronounce itself on the legality of the practice.

//Cue in: "Even the blood …

Cue out: …. criminality and prosecuting,"//

Dr. Richard Nam, the Prime Minister Lango Cultural Foundation, says the practice of blood compensation is part of Lango culture, which can't be avoided. He says the practice is also enshrined in the new constitution of Lango Cultural institution, which has been approved by the Attorney General and Ministry of Gender, Labor and Cultural Development as a normal practice.

Dr. Nam argues that blood compensation enhances peaceful co-existence among different clan members of the ethnic group. Joseph Odongo, 47 a, member of Ngurapuc clan in Lango, says he once used blood compensation to reconcile with the family of a 19-year-old-girl whom he erroneously hit to death in a motorcycle accident.