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LRA Attacks, Abductions Declining - Report :: Uganda Radionetwork
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LRA Attacks, Abductions Declining - Report

The Lords Resistance Army LRA rebel attacks on civilians in Central African Republic CAR and neighbouring countries are on a decline, the LRA Crisis Tracker reveals. Brigadier Richard Karemire, the Uganda Peoples Defence Forces UPDF spokesperson, says that the decline in abductions and attacks shows that the LRA is no more. He says thats why the UPDF started withdrawing from CAR, adding that they have neutralised the rebel capacity to make war.
Civilian attacks by the LRA rebels have been reducing over the years.
The Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) rebel attacks on civilians in Central African Republic (CAR) and neighbouring countries are on a decline, the LRA Crisis Tracker reveals.

 

LRA Crisis Tracker is a joint project of two charity organisations—Invisible Children and Resolve.

 

The report notes that there has been a 38.9% decrease in attacks, 40.9% decrease in civilian killings and a 51.2% decrease in abductions between 2016 and 2017.

 

The year 2017 registered the lowest number of abductions at 399 and the lowest number of attacks at 122 with 13 civilian killings registered, according to statistics of the past five years.

 

The year 2016, however, registered the highest number of abductions at 755 with 200 attacks and 22 civilian killings. In 2015, 612 abductions and 213 attacks were recorded with 12 fatalities on civilians. In 2014, the LRA carried out 649 abductions in 211 attacks which saw 13 killings.

 

The year 2013 registered the highest number of civilian killings at 76, with 483 abductions and 192 attacks.

 

The LRA's latest major attack was on September 24, 2017 where a group of rebels attacked the community of Kpabou in CAR and looted the community of food and non-food items and abducted 23 community members as porters.

 

The latest returnee event was on December 17 where eight civilians were abducted by the LRA but were able to escape after a group of militia fighters pursued and clashed with the LRA rebels.

 

Brigadier Richard Karemire, the Uganda People's Defence Forces (UPDF) spokesperson, says that the decline in abductions and attacks shows that the LRA is no more. He says that's why the UPDF started withdrawing from CAR, adding that they have neutralised the rebel capacity to make war.

 

"We went to CAR, not to capture LRA warlord Joseph Kony, but to make sure the rebels are no longer terrorizing the region, and this we feel has been ably done," he says.

 

The UPDF in 2016 began pulling out of the Central African Republic where it had launched a military offensive against Joseph Kony. In 2010, the United States sent 100 Special Forces soldiers to support UPDF with intelligence gathering but this was also called off.

 

The LRA insurgency lasted for two decades in the Northern part of Uganda leaving approximately 100,000 people dead and nearly two million people displaced.

 

The fighting ended with a peace deal in 2006, which the rebels declined to sign, and have been operating outside Uganda, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, Sudan and the Central African Republic. 

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