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Meet the 'Samaritan' Who Gave Hope to Kira Road Accident Victims

The aftermath was a painful and traumatizing experience as good Samaritans used metallic objects and to rescue passengers, who were trapped in the wreckage. Kizza was one of the good Samaritans who was seen manning the rescue mission, saving victims from the wreckage of the vehicle and putting them in contact with friends and relatives.
Ronald Kizza

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Ronald Kizza is possibly unknown to the Ugandan public. But he was captured by different media platforms working tooth and nail to rescue dozens of people in the aftermath of a gruesome Kira Road junction accident that happened on April 24. 

A total of eight motor vehicles and two motorcycles were involved in the accident that took place when a trailer registration number UAA 497L lost control and rammed into vehicles that were waiting for a green signal from the Kira Road traffic lights. The accident left four people dead and 27 others nursing injuries. 

The aftermath was a painful and traumatizing experience as good Samaritans used metallic objects and to rescue passengers, who were trapped in the wreckage. Kizza was one of the good Samaritans who was seen manning the rescue mission, saving victims from the wreckage of the vehicle and putting them in contact with friends and relatives. 

The accident found him riding on a motorcycle through the Bukoto Stretch and he watched as the cars wandered off the land, one after the other.  At first, it didn’t cross his mind as something serious. However, he followed his instincts and dropped the journey to Agape Ministries in Ntinda where he works as a choir instructor, to take charge of the rescue process. 

//Cue in; “I didn’t know...   

Cue out…suffocation.”//   

Kizza says he found victims yelling with no practical effort to get them out of the wreckage. He does not recall where and how he acquired a stick but he found himself with one in hands, which he used to whip inactive spectators of the scene. 

He was soon joined by a team from the Uganda Red Cross and together they started removing victims from the vehicles. Some were unconscious; others were bleeding profusely while several were screaming their lungs out. 

“I saw people trapped in metals and I first told victims to relax because it was going to be fine. It was tricky to just pull someone. We wanted to make it safe,” Kizza says as he recounts the agony of a young girl, aged about seven, who was rescued with an opening in the neck and profusely bleeding. She had been cut by a metal. 

When the girl was delivered to Mulago hospital, she was attended to by a doctor who stitched the opening. She was, however, crying for her mother who had been badly injured in the same accident.

//Cue in; “It was…  

Cue out…bleeding.”// 

Kizza says he asked every victim to share contacts of their relatives, whom he personally called to deliver the distressing news. He says that most of the people he contacted were watching the accident on television screens but unaware that their relatives were involved. 

“Some could ask ‘you mean this accident I am watching involved my wife’. They sounded frightened. I asked them to be calm because their relatives were receiving treatment. I made calls as I monitored the victims,” Kizza says. 

Solomon Luzinda, whose wife Christine was eventually amputated at CORSU hospital along Entebbe Road, was one of the people contacted by Kizza after the accident. At the time of the disturbing call, he was uploading a video of the same accident that had been sent to him by his young sister. They both didn’t know that their own was involved.  

“When I received a call from a gentleman informing me about the accident, I immediately asked where he was. He told me my wife was at Mulago hospital. My sister told me to be cautious because the call could have come from a fraudster. But we confirmed the news after she spoke to him,” Luzinda says. 

In Mulago, Kizza handed over the responsibility of to each of the relatives as and when they arrived, and he kept a close watch on all the others until their next of kin took charge.  He shares the pain of seeing some of them succumb to injuries while at the hospital. 

Kizza also ensured that in the process of transporting the victims, there were no blood mix-ups. 

“I don’t remember the Red Cross gentleman but he did great work. He gave us the technical support. He agreed with me when I refused to put two people on the same car since there could have been blood mixing,” Kizza adds. 

He says he rescued about seven people but two of them succumbed to the injuries less than two hours after arrival at Mulago hospital. One of them was identified as 28-year-old Phillippa Musimenta. 

//Cue in; “Where I credit…  

Cue out …blood mixing.”// 

This was his first time that Kizza participate in an accident rescue mission. The senior-four school dropout who prefers to say less about his family is a choirmaster at Agape Ministries.

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