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Ntoroko Cattle Keepers Seek Gov't Intervention Over Floods

Two months ago, floods hit Ntoroko after Lake Albert burst its banks. The floods affected Kanara Town Council where it destroyed several homes, schools, health centers, and killed domestic animals among other things.
Floods have covered pastures in several farms in Ntoroko district.
Cattle keepers in Ntoroko under their umbrella, Butuku Cattle Marketing Cooperative Society - BCMCS, are seeking government intervention over the persistent floods in the district.

Two months ago, floods hit Ntoroko after Lake Albert burst its banks. The floods affected Kanara Town Council where it destroyed several homes, schools, health centers, and killed domestic animals among other things.  

The cattle keepers express fears that the floods continue to submerge their farms and cattle keeping, the major economic activity in the district, is under threat.   

A 15-member delegation comprising of cattle keepers and the district leaders met at the district headquarters in Kibuku town council. 

During the meeting, the over 200 cooperative society members said that hundreds of cattle had already died and others are too malnourished due to lack of pasture. 

The members wanted the government to allocate them part of Tooro-Semuliki Wildlife Reserve for temporary settlement and grazing of their animals. 

During the meeting, a committee was selected to represent them in different discussions with government officials including President Museveni.

  

The delegation members include the BCMCS Chairperson, Charles Kasoro; Ntoroko LC V chairperson, Ben Muthahinga; Ntoroko Speaker, Edward Kahuma; the two Members of Parliament Anne Mary Tumwine and Gerald Rwemulikya and the Ntoroko Resident District Commissioner, Elijah Biryabarema.

Kasoro said that even when some leaders like the State Minister for Disaster Preparedness, Musa Ecweru, visited the area, they have never received any help from the government. 

Kahuma told the cattle keepers to be patient and wait for permission from the government before occupying the game reserve. 

The committee will again meet on Friday and agree on the issues they will include in a document that they will be presenting to the different government officials they plan to meet next week.  

Tooro-Semliki Wildlife Reserve was established as a game reserve in 1926 and was among the first protected areas to be gazetted. The main reason was to protect the large numbers of Uganda Kobs in the area.   

The other animals found in the reserve include lions, elephants, deer and monkeys. It covers an area of 542 square kilometers and is located within Ntoroko and Kabarole districts. It lies 700 meters above sea level.