Breaking

Nwoya Bans Sale and Consumption of Sachets Alcohol

The local leaders say they are concerned that the liquor that is widely consumed mainly among the youth could turn disastrous to the health and productive capacity of the young generation in the district. Presently, it is very common to see young boys and elders alike walking or riding bicycles while sucking the alcoholic contents of the sachets, usually hanging from their mouths.
The Nwoya district council plans to ban the sale and consumption of alcohol packed in sachets.

 

The local leaders say they are concerned that the liquor could turn disastrous to the health and productive capacity of the young generation in the district.

The alcohol is popular among young boys and elders alike. The site of men and boys sipping  onto the alcoholic contents in the sachets, usually hanging from their mouths is increasingly becoming a common site.

 

Tom Ociti, the LC5 council representative for Koch Goma has already drafted and moved a motion seeking to ban the liquor from the district. Ociti says he is concerned about the rampant and increasing sale and consumption of the liquor.

He explained that the drink, which is packed in sachets and cheaply sold in the community, does not carry any information about the content apart from the various names on the labels.

 

He says consumers of the liquor to develop red lips and even primary school pupils have started carrying the liquor to classrooms in their school bags.

 

Ociti expressed worry that laws such as the Enguli Act and Liquor Act have not been used to address the increasing sale and consumption of alcohol. He however said he was happy that the district council has accepted his motion and referred it to the general purpose committee that is expected to work on the practicability of enforcing the ban.

 

The move has so far attracted mixed reactions from across section of the members of the community. While others are happy about the move, others especially the consumers and sellers are not pleased saying it would affect their earnings and livelihood.

 

Moses Okello, the Nwoya District Police Commander has said he is not aware about any such resolution to ban the sale and consumption of the liquor. He says enforcing such a directive would be difficult saying it is possible the dealers in such liquors could have obtained licenses to sell the product.

 

In November 2009, Gulu district council made a similar move by resolving to ban the sale and consumption of unrefined liquor. The decision stemmed from the deaths of about 30 people who had drunk alcohol laced with methanol. The drink whose consumption has become widespread also led to the loss of sight of at least 10 people.

 

Dr Paul Onek, the District Health Officer said tests carried on the drink indicated that it was adulterated with methanol, which he said affects the optic nerve, leading to loss of sight and death if consumed in large quantity.

 

While the Gulu district council resolution made it illegal to possess, sell, consume or carry out any dealing in the unrefined liquor regardless of the packaging, the Nwoya district council resolution seeks to ban only alcohol packed in sachets.

 

The Gulu resolution led to arrests of several culprits and confiscation of thousands of jerricans of the liquor, an act that significantly reduced the sale and consumption of the liquor.

### 

Keywords