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P.7 Leavers Encouraged to Embrace Vocational Training

Courses after P.7 include landscaping, cleaning services, carpentry and joinery, cabinet making, painting and decorating, bricklaying, industrial control, electrical installations, plumbing and heating, amongst others.

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The State Minister for Primary Education Rosemary Seninde has encouraged Primary Seven leavers to go for technical training as an alternative route to a better future.

Speaking at the ceremony to release the 2018 Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) results in Kampala, Seninde says while heading to Senior One is in order, heading the other way to technical school is also rewarding.

Seninde encourages parents to consider taking their children to take their children to technical schools, stating that they are not for failures as is perceived.

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Although many P.7 leavers join secondary schools, options for vocational education exist under the Universal Post Primary Education Training (UPPET) programme.

According to the education ministry, at least 10 percent of P.7 leavers have the option of doing vocational training straight away.

Courses after P.7 include landscaping, cleaning services, carpentry and joinery, cabinet making, painting and decorating, bricklaying, industrial control, electrical installations, plumbing and heating, amongst others.

According to the Education Policy Data Centre of FHI360, an international non-governmental organization, while the transition rate from primary to secondary is 58 percent, only 34 percent of those who transit complete Senior Four.

A study, the 2015-16 Education and Sports Sector Annual Performance Report (ESSAPR), also shows that about 1.2 million students of the 3.6 million pupils who passed Primary Leaving Examination (PLE) between 2002 and 2011 did not complete O-level.

The analysis considered UNEB and ESSAPR records of learners who passed PLE between 2002 and 2011 and sat their Uganda Certificate of Education (UCE) examinations between 2006 and 2015.

The perception that products of these courses do not succeed in life has been debunked because many are quite successful, compared to those who continued through secondary education.

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