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Pader Families Seek Justice for Relatives Killed in 1990

Several survivors want an independent commission of inquiry into the killing so that appropriate interventions are formulated to support the victims and help them attain psychological healing. They also want a monument built in memory of the departed.
Mata Aracha, 81, a survivor of the notorious holocaust whose husband and son were killed on the fateful day (12)

Audio 3

More than 20 families in Pader district are seeking compensation for their loved ones who were killed during the infamous February 1990 massacre in Komyokke, Lakwot-lwor and Lamel villages in present-day Pader district.

Up to 47 people were allegedly rounded off and shot at close range by government soldiers, who were pursuing Lord's Resistance Army-LRA rebels. The killings were reportedly commanded by Matayo Kyaligonza then at the rank of Major in the armed forces, and Rtd Gen. David Tinyefuza, now known as Sejusa.

Mata Aracha, 81, a survivor whose husband and son were killed on the fateful day told URN that the LRA rebels had pitched camp and cooked meals at their home.

// Cue in; "Tooli enoni ba....

Cue out…igang kany adaa-leni."//

Aracha explained that her late husband Santo Oryem was a village chairperson, then known as Resistance Council leaders, and had been accused of collaborating with the rebels because one of his subjects, Komakech George Omona was a Brigadier in the LRA rebel ranks.

// Cue in; "Kong ki cogo....

Cue out…mede donga en."//

Santa Ajok, 48, another widow says that she has endured trauma and suffering since the horrific incident that ended the life of her husband and her father.

// Cue in; "Too-ne pe abedo ki....

Cue out…en aye dong latini eno-neni."//

Another survivor Charles Okot challenges the government to take responsibility for the heinous atrocities committed by its soldiers.

Several other survivors, want an independent commission of inquiry into the killing so that appropriate interventions are formulated to support the victims and help them attain psychological healing. They also want a monument built in memory of the departed.