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Police Gets Human Rights Policy

The policy which has been in the pipeline for the last four years was funded by the British High Commission in partnership with Uganda Human Rights Network HURINET.
13 Feb 2019 17:50
The Human Rights policy handout books that will be distributed to all police officers

Audio 3

The Uganda Police Force has launched its first ever Human Rights Policy. The policy is meant to guide operations and welfare of the institution. 

The policy which has been in the pipeline for the last four years was funded by the British High Commission in partnership with Uganda Human Rights Network (HURINET).

This follows complaints against the police for abuse of human rights. 

According to Dr Roselyn Kamugongo Ssegawa, the consultant who compiled the policy, it captures different laws which gives the police force mandate and tries to align them to the different National, Regional and International Human Rights Treaties.

Ssegawa says that the policy is two-sided capturing the rights of police officers especially their welfare and working conditions as well as the public whom the officers serve.

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The Inspector General of Police Martin Okoth Ochoa says the policy will strengthen and ensure human rights are observed during police operations.

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The Constitution and the Police Act gives Police a mandate advancement and enhancement of peace and stability, order and adherence to the rule of law and good governance to ensure internal co-existence with the public.

The police act also gives police officers, power to arrest, detain and even use weapons against citizens. 

Police has for the last six years often been accused of Human Rights violations.

The British High Commissioner to Uganda Peter West says the acts of torture taints the image of the police.

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