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Police Still Using Rudimentary Ways to Identify Unknown Persons :: Uganda Radionetwork
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Police Still Using Rudimentary Ways to Identify Unknown Persons

According to Owoyesigyire, they try their best to describe the appearance of the unknown person and make announcements calling up friends and relatives with a missing person to identify them.

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Uganda Police Force is yet to adopt new technologies of identifying unknown persons. 

These include bodies recovered without any identification documents, severely injured persons, the mentally ill and children among others. 

Currently, once police receives an unknown person, they provide descriptions detailing the color of their clothes and estimated age and invite the public to identify the person.

Luke Owoyesigyire, the Kampala Metropolitan Police Spokesperson deals with several unknown persons on a weekly basis. 

According to Owoyesigyire, they try their best to describe the appearance of the unknown person and make announcements calling up friends and relatives with a missing person to identify them.

//Cue in: "" When you find...

Cue out: ... not identified."//

He explains that although the method works most of the time, it is very tiresome, costly to the police force and sometimes inaccurate.

Where the face is unrecognizable, the force has had to bare the cost of DNA against several claimants while in other circumstances the bodies are left at the mortuary for months and years.

In 2015, when the National Identifications and Registration Authority-NIRA completed the national identity card enrollment exercise, the plan was to share the data with Uganda Police Force. The data would include a finger print database that would make identification of persons simpler by comparing their finger prints to an existing database.

However, NIRA has never handed over the data base to the Police force. Currently, police has to make a formal request to NIRA for any information to be checked unlike Telecom Companies, which are in possession of the database. 

Police Spokesperson, Emilian Kayima says there is hope in the planed Forensic Center of Excellence at Naguru Police Headquarters by a Chinese firm in exchange for 60acres of land for the construction of a satellite City. 

"Once we have the Regional Forensic Center of Excellency constructed and equipped, we shall create our own database with all those things," Kayima said. The Directorate of Interpol and international relations is already developing a database.  

The database includes details of high profile suspects and individuals seeking letters of good Conduct. Even then, the database isn't utilized with some of the people not cross referenced to it. 

Maintaining it has become hard because of the failure by detectives to take the finger prints of suspects.

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