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Road Users Protest Poor State of Gulu-Attiak-Nimule Highway

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More than 100 cargo trucks connecting to and from Nimule ply Gulu-Attiak-Nimule Highway each day. However, the road has been in a sorry state for over four years. It is filled with potholes and shattered drainage system almost all the way from Gulu City to Amuru district.
Road users struggle to repair a tyre after hitting a pot hole at Parabongo along the Gulu-Attiak-Nimule Highway
Road users are unhappy with the poor state of Gulu-Attiak-Nimule Highway. The 106 kilometer road stretch connects Tanzania-Kenya, Uganda and Nimule in South Sudan through Gulu City and Amuru district.  The road was tarmacked in 2015 at the tune of Shillings 89 billion with funding from the World Bank.  

More than 100 cargo trucks connecting to and from Nimule ply Gulu-Attiak-Nimule Highway each day. However, the road has been in a sorry state for over four years. It is filled with potholes and shattered drainage system almost all the way from Gulu City to Amuru district.  


The most affected areas include For-God, Customs Corner in Gulu, Awer and Parabongo in Amuru district. Michael Lakony, the Amuru District LC V Chairperson, says more than three cases of serious accidents are recorded along the bad spots on the road between Parabongo and Attiak Town Council weekly.  

He explains that the most affected are motorcyclists who hit the potholes while riding at night and end up sustaining serious injuries and damage to their motorcycles. According to Lakony, he petitioned Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA) recently demanding for immediate repair of the worst affected areas.   


Job Ronny Okot, who plies the road during his routine fieldwork, told URN that he survived an accident after his car hit a pothole at Parabongo Trading center in Amuru district. He appealed to UNRA to expedite the repair works, saying the road is dangerous for user.

Christopher Acaye, a motorcyclist, says in addition to accidents they also endure severe bodily pains after long rides on the road. UNRA Spokesperson, Mark Ssali, says they have started repairing the most affected areas on the road in phases.