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Security Personnel Concerned over Concealment of Unexploded Ordnances

Thousands of such explosive remnants of war like bombs; grenades and unexploded shells were buried underground after the two-decade long armed conflict between Government and Lord’s Resistance Army – LRA rebels (1986 – 2006).
16 Mar 2020 17:59
Maj. Caesar Olweny, the UPDF 4th Division Spokesperson - Photo by Dominic Ochola

Audio 2

Security personnel in Acholi sub-region are concerned over by actions of some members of the public who conceal information about the presence of unexploded ordnances or bombs for monetary benefits. 

Thousands of such explosive remnants of warlike bombs; grenades and unexploded shells were buried underground after the two-decade-long armed conflict between Government and Lord’s Resistance Army – LRA rebels (1986 – 2006).

The explosives continue to pose security threats to the civilian population across the eight districts of especially Pader, Gulu, Nwoya, Amuru, Omoro, Lamwo, Kitgum and Agago where LRA rebel activities were most prevalent.

Maj. Caesar Olweny, the UPDF 4th Division Spokesperson revealed that they have encountered several of such cases including that of an LC 2 Chairperson of a village in Paboo Sub-County in Amuru District who declined to expose whereabouts of an explosive device recovered in his area.

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Aswa River Region Police Spokesperson, Patrick Jimmy Okema also revealed that they encountered a similar incident in Omoro District after a man in Gwenotwom village implored security to first pay him before extracting an explosive device from his compound.

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Dusman Okee, the Pader Resident District Commissioner – RDC also shared experience, saying he was recently compelled to pay 20,000 shillings to a man who had wanted his efforts rewarded for discovering an explosive bomb.

Security personnel have also mapped over 260 places especially in Pader, Nwoya, Amuru, Gulu and Omoro districts that are still infested with explosive remnants of war that require extraction but they lack logistical support has been a major setback.


While dozens of people continue to die due to the presence of unexploded bombs, a section of some local authorities has blamed the practice on the biting level of poverty that has bedevilled the post-war community in Northern Uganda.

In early 2005, Office of the Prime Minister - OPM and other peace-related Non-Governmental Organizations during the resettlement of internally displaced persons encouraged financial rewards to individuals who discovered and disclosed the whereabouts of explosive remnants of war but that has since ended.