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Seizure Monitoring Tool Boosts Treatment of Nodding Syndrome

Ceaser Okot, the coordinator Hope for Humans says the tool also allows for checking the weight of the child, recording of seizure frequencies, the height of the child and how the affected children relate to each other.

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There is a reported improvement in the condition of children suffering from the Nodding Syndrome following the development of an online seizure monitoring tool.

Hope for Humanity, a local charity says the seizure monitoring tool was developed in 2013 by Susan Gazda, a Neurology specialist working with Center for Disease Control to help track and report seizure activity in the affected children.

Ceaser Okot, the coordinator Hope for Humans says the tool also allows for checking the weight of the child, recording of seizure frequencies, the height of the child and how the affected children relate to each other.

He says the results help medical officers to determine the type of medication and the level of attention each child needs. Okot says they have registered tremendous improvement in the condition of the children since they started using the tool adding that, up to 21 children have been discharged and reunited with their community.

//Cue in: “And then some…………………..

Cue out: ………Twice in a week”//

Rebecca Akello is a Nurse working with nodding disease children in Odek Sub County in Gulu district. Akello says that recording the number of times a child gets seizures enables medical personnel to improve medication or even discharge a child. 

She says the seizure frequency amongst the affected children has decreased from a daily occurrence to twice a month because of appropriate medication offered to the patients. 

Christine Apio, the communications officer Hope for Humans says that they intend to train parents of the discharged children on poultry and piggery to enable them get sustainable incomes to support the children.

//Cue in: “How the child………….

Cue out:……………started nodding”//

There are 71 children with the Nodding Syndrome directly under the charity and more than 100 others under the outreach program. Micheal Cankara, the focal person Nodding syndrome in Gulu district says many of the children have gained weight as their nutrition has improved.

According to the Centre for Disease Control CDC, Nodding syndrome is an unexplained neurologic condition characterized by episodes of repetitive forward dropping of the head, often accompanied by other seizure-like activity, such as convulsions or staring spells. 

The condition predominantly affects children aged between 5 to15 years and has been reported Western and Central Equatorial in South Sudan, Northern Uganda and Southern Tanzania

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