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Students Struggling with Career Development in Soroti

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At Soroti Secondary School, one of the colonial schools with more than 2,000 students, some students in ‘A’ level took subject combinations basing on the preference of their parents.
Students of Soroti Sec School.

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Limited career guidance in schools and families is affecting student's choices in taking up combinations for advanced level and tertiary education.

Some students are either influenced by their parents, teacher or friends on the subject combination or course they take in tertiary institution. Some students are forced to take subjects outside their ability and preference to maintain the family record or lifestyle. 

At Soroti Secondary School, one of the colonial schools with more than 2,000 students, some students in ‘A’ level took subject combinations basing on the preference of their parents. 

Others were influenced by teachers and friends basing on their performance in the Uganda Certificate Education exams. Ambrose Edwonu, a senior five Student says he battled with his parents when deciding on his combination. 

Edwonu, now doing MEG/ICT was required to offer PCB/ICT by his parents in order to qualify for bachelor of human medicine at university. 

//Cue in “In fact, my parents... 

Cue out...an accountant”//

Sarah Atim, another student in senior six is struggling with PCM/ICT in order to become a civil engineer, a career chosen by her parents. Atim says that much as her dream was to become a medical surgeon, her father needed someone to be an engineer at home. 

//Cue in “My dad wanted...

Cue out...take up PCM”//

Moses Apalu, another student in senior five wants to become a teacher after being inspired by his teachers. Apalu has experience of both rough and soft hand teachers in imparting knowledge to students.

//Cue in “When I was in...

Cue out...taught better”//

Aaron Ochen Kato, a student of senior six wants to be a journalist. Ochen, who previously wanted to be an engineer has changed his mind after attending radio programs and sometimes performs at comedy shows and is hired as master of ceremonies. 

//Cue in “I wanted to be...

Cue out...still carrying it”//

Peter Malinga, a teacher in Soroti Secondary School says careers are determined by performance, to a bigger extent, and aspirations. 

But Nelson Amechu, a parent of Light Secondary School in Soroti says he only encourages his children to concentrate on sciences in order to get jobs that will earn them good money. 

“If you asked me what I would want my children to be, I would say that I want only doctors and engineers in my home. That is where I see money these days but do I have to power to make their brains perform that way?”, he said.