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Trust Fund For Victims Extends Assistance in Northern Uganda

Pieter W. I. de Baan, the Executive Director of the Trust Fund for Victims says the six organizations will receive a minimum grant of 50,000 Euros approximately 212 Million shillings to continue implementing assistance programme for physical rehabilitation, psychological rehabilitation as well as material support for victims of the conflict.
Victim of LRA Mutilation In Northern Uganda
The Trust Fund for Victims has extended its assistance programme to victims of the Lord's Resistance Army in Northern Uganda by another five years.

The assistance programme will be implemented by six organizations selected from a group of 12 applicants through a competitive process which eliminated 13 other organizations in the first round of evaluation.

They are expected to implement the programme in districts under-served by civil society organizations in Northern Uganda. The Fund's last set of three assistance projects expired last month.

Pieter W. I. de Baan, the Executive Director of the Trust Fund for Victims says the six organizations will receive a minimum grant of 212 Million shillings to continue implementing assistance programme for physical rehabilitation, psychological rehabilitation as well as material support for victims of the conflict.

Started in 2002 under the Rome Statute the Trust Fund implements programs for compensation ordered by the ICC as well as assistance to victims affected by war crimes and crimes against humanity or genocide.

The Trust Fund for Victims started operating in Northern Uganda in 2008 and estimates that there are still 70,000 victims of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) requiring assistance in the post-conflict region.

Since then, the Fund has disbursed 39 Billion shillings in various assistance programmes including reconstructive surgery for victims whose body parts were mutilated by fighters of the brutal rebel group.

Scott Bartell, the Programs Manager of Trust Funds for Victims in Uganda says the Fund disbursed an average of about 5.3 Billion shillings annually in the previous phase of their programme. He says more than 45,000 victims have benefited directly with another 200,000 benefiting indirectly.

According to Bartell, the six new programs will integrate psychological assistance with livelihood supports in agriculture and vocational skills training while undertaking physical rehabilitation of victims and survivors of the conflict who are still living with fragments of bombs and bullets in their bodies.