Warning: Trying to access array offset on value of type bool in /usr/www/users/urnnet/a/story.php on line 43
Trust Fund for Victims Stops Funding to Gulu Orthopedic Centre :: Uganda Radionetwork
Breaking

Trust Fund for Victims Stops Funding to Gulu Orthopedic Centre

Top story
The fund says the operation of the center will be handed over to the control and funding of Gulu Regional Referral Hospital. The center manufactures and repairs artificial prosthetic limbs for amputated victims of the Lords Resistance Army-LRA conflict in Northern Uganda
Victim of LRA Mutilation In Northern Uganda

Audio 4

The Trust Fund for Victims plans to end support to the Gulu Orthopedic Centre.

The fund says the operation of the centre will be handed over to the control and funding of Gulu Regional Referral Hospital. The center manufactures and repairs artificial prosthetic limbs for amputated victims of the Lord's Resistance Army-LRA conflict in Northern Uganda.

Scott Bartell, the Programs Manager for the Trust Fund for Victims in Uganda says the fund has started preparations to relinquish financial support the operations of the Centre to Gulu Hospital.

//Cue in: "We are now…

Cue out… remains to be done."//

According to Scott, the Trust Fund for Victims has trained technicians at the facility which was built by the Association of Volunteers in International Assistance (AVSI) to maintain the center in the post Trust Fund support era. 

//Cue in: "Over the years…

Cue out…at some point"//

While supporting the centre, the Funds introduced the SWISS Leg technology to replace the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) technology which had been used for many years. Scott says the technology was introduced after a study indicated that the innovative prosthetic design was cost effective to manufacture.

//Cue in: "The program started…

Cue out…we have been using that"//

Scott says the new SWISS leg is preferred by many victims for several reasons including enabling them to participate in agriculture and other livelihood activities. He says it has enabled many victims to engage in gainful economic activities.

//Cue in: "Many of the victims…

Cue out…receiving in the end"//

Under the same assistance program, the Trust Fund for Victims has repaired the lost smiles of victims whose lips were maimed during the conflict which lasted more than two decades by paying for their reconstructive plastic surgeries.

Scott says the Fund treated 70 of such victims whose lips and ears had been mutilated who were identified from across the epicenter of the conflict which affected the northern Uganda region.

Paolina Massida, the Legal Representatives of Victims at the International Criminal Court (ICC) acknowledges that the various support of the Trust Fund for Victims has comforted victims and facilitated their recovery. She says the needs of victims of the conflict are various and some of them should have been dealt with a long time ago.

According to Massida, the office of the counsel for victims has continuously recommended to the Trust Funds for Victims to engage in early victims' assistance in situations of conflicts.

The Trust Fund for Victims started working in Northern Uganda in 2008, six years after it was set up in 2002 under the Rome Statute to undertake reparations ordered by the International Criminal Court as well as assistance to victims affected by war crimes and crimes against humanity or genocide.

Scott says the Fund which has since disbursed 39 billion Shillings since 2008 in Northern Uganda, currently disburses an average of about 5.3 billion Shillings annually.  Since implementation started in Northern Uganda, Scott says more than 45,000 victims have benefited directly from the fund while another 200,000 have benefited indirectly.

The programs are implemented by community development partners who support victims of the LRA conflict in Northern Uganda. The UN estimates that 10,000 people were killed and thousands of children and women abducted as fighters and sex slaves.