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Two More Villages Declared Open Defecation Free in Moroto

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Open defecation is still a challenge in Moroto district with only 15.6% pit latrine coverage, according to the district health report, 2017. This has left cases of diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, cholera and other sanitation related diseases high in the district.
Moroto district chairman, Andrew Keem Napaja [on yellow shirt], RDC Peter Ken Lochap [on swaeter] and other officials from Caritas Moroto putting up signpost indicating ODF in Kamera village.
Looi and Kamera villages in Nadunget Sub County in Moroto district have been declared Open Defecation Free- ODF.  The villages attained ODF status last week following the intervention by Caritas Moroto Diocese with support from UKAID and CAFORD.     

The diocese was implanting its fourth project titled “Improved access to water, sanitation and hygiene for disadvantaged communities in Northern Uganda.” The declaration of Looi and Kamera brings to eight, the number of villages with ODF status in Moroto district.   

There are 198 villages in Moroto district. Walter Owiny, the Moroto District Water and Sanitation Officer, says all the villages with ODF status are in Nadunget due to the involvement of partners.     He notes that locals including the leadership of Moroto don’t value sanitation. 

“There is negative attitude and mindset towards sanitation especially in construction and usage of pit latrines. Many people here like answering nature calls in the bushes and flowing rivers around. But we are working hard to ensure that open defecation ceases to be an issue in Moroto”, he said.

Open defecation is still a challenge in Moroto district with only 15.6% pit latrine coverage, according to the district health report, 2017.  This has left cases of diarrhea, dysentery, typhoid, cholera and other sanitation related diseases high in the district.  

Interventions on Hygiene and Sanitation especially on constructing pit latrines have largely been left to partners. In most cases, when partners leave after the expiry of their project, people return to their original lifestyle.  

A mini survey by URN indicates that some of the villages like Namijimij that were declared open defecation free have reverted to their old lifestyle of using rivers for answering nature calls. Political support on sanitation especially on the use of pit latrines is still lagging, according to the same report. 

The report authored by the district health office in Moroto shows that 57 percent of the leaders have pit latrines in their homes and residences unlike in 2014 where barely 30 percent of leaders could possess pits. Out of six sub counties including two divisions in Moroto, URN could confirm only two LC3 chairpersons with pit latrines in use at their households. 

A number of district and sub county councilors have not heed to the calls for construction pit latrines. At the village and parish levels, only a handful of leaders have pit latrines.