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Ugandans Demand Reconciliation Program After 2016 Polls

Maureen Alice Drateru, a teacher says many Ugandans are still angry and disjointed especially after the outcome of the February 18 Presidential election. She says many people still cannot sit on a round-table to discuss issues because of the feeling that they were cheated.
Ugandans citizens are calling for a deliberate reconciliation program to deal with the grief, anger and differences in the aftermath of the 2016 general election.

The call was made in Arua district during a feedback session on the elections in Uganda organized by Citizens' Coalition for Electoral Democracy in Uganda (CCEDU), Thursday.

Maureen Alice Drateru, a teacher says many Ugandans are still angry and disjointed especially after the outcome of the February 18 Presidential election. She says many people remain hostile to each other and cannot sit on a round-table to discuss issues because of the feeling that they were cheated.

She says a deliberate campaign to encourage, counsel and reconcile aggrieved citizens is needed in order to pacify the country.

Raima Karim, the Arua Municipality FDC delegate says many people's expectations were quashed after the presidential elections. Similarly one of the elders in the area Jafar Olekua says the rejection of demand driven reforms by the government dampened hopes amongst Ugandans for a free and fair election.

Olekua says sensitizing voters needs to be done as a continuous process in order to ensure that the population understands the relevance of elections.

Nancy Akello, the West Nile region electoral commission officer says civic education is still lacking making it hard for voters to understand their rights in the voting process. "Ugandans need to be vigilant to avoid suspicions during voting day and understand how to protect their votes" Akello said. 

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