Breaking

UNBS Directs Dealers To Take Sub-standard Iron Bars Off Market

“If found, the substandard iron bars will be seized and destroyed with no recourse and charges will be brought against you in accordance with the Laws of the Republic of Uganda. This warning takes immediate effect,” they statement warns.
UNBS, UMA have launched crackdown on substandard ribbed bars


The Uganda National Bureau of Standards (UNBS) has directed manufacturers of and dealers in iron bars to immediately stop the selling of bars that do not comply with the Ugandan Standards. 

UNBS says it has observed that substandard iron bars are flooding the market with many unsuspecting individuals falling victim.  

The sale of substandard iron bars deprives the customer of the value for their money, promotes unfair trade and compromises with the quality of the construction thus safety of structures.  

“Accordingly, all ribbed bars should meet the requirements of the Ugandan Standard US EAS 412-2:2019 - Steel for the reinforcement of concrete - Part 2: Ribbed bars (3rd Edition),” says a statement from the UNBS.  

The standard agency says that bars not meeting these specifications shall not be placed in the market for sale, or they will be removed at the cost of the owner of the stock. UNBS says all ribbed bars should meet the requirements of the Ugandan Standard reinforcement of concrete - Part 2: Ribbed bars (3rd Edition).

 

The main characteristics of the substandard bars are lengths shorter than the specified 12 metres, a smaller nominal diameter than the specified as well as poor labeling or marking. Others include easily breaking on bending as well as less weight per meter than that specified in the standards.  

The UNBS Head of Marketing and Public Relations, Sylvia Kirabo says customers can tell the genuineness of an iron bar by examining and verifying that it has a manufacturer’s name and/or logo in indelible marking. She says the steel grade like 500C WR, 500B WR as well as the nominal diameter must be clearly indicated on the bar, and it must also bear the name of the country of origin and the batch or cast number at the time of dispatch from the manufacture premises.  

Kirabo says that unfortunately, users or buyers do not know how to tell between the right and wrong quality, yet it is their fundamental right to ask for clarity. “Ask for the chemical and mechanical properties, test certificate issued by the manufacturer. Your supplier, whether stockist or manufacturer are mandated by UNBS to have this information available to you upon request for your projects.”  

The bars are of a standard length of 12 metres unless one has a UNBS permit for using special sized iron bars. 

In a statement UNBS warns manufacturers, importers, stockists, dealers and contractors are warned against selling or using substandard steel bars.  “If found, the substandard iron bars will be seized and destroyed with no recourse and charges will be brought against you in accordance with the Laws of the Republic of Uganda.

This warning takes immediate effect,” they statement warns.  

Buyers are encouraged to maintain appropriate documentation like valid receipts for every transaction, in case there is need to petition either the seller/manufacturer or the authorities.  

"Carry out independent tests for the iron bars purchased at any UNBS recognised testing laboratories; these laboratories can be found on UNBS website. You can ask for a refund or replacement of the iron bars if the iron bars do not meet the requirements of the Uganda Standard,” she appeals.  

She says the buyer also have a right to seek legal redress through UNBS in case the stockist or manufacturer is not collaborating.

Uganda Manufacturers Association Executive Director, Daniel Birungi says the private sector was involved in the development of the standards, and their enforcement is long overdue.

"Substandard products affect the market, both export and domestic because they customers get disappointed and decide to abandon all local products." 

Images 1

Entities