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UWA Undecided on Stockpiles of Confiscated Wildlife Exhibits

Currently, the UWA has over 8 tonnes of elephant tusks, rhino horns, and Pangolin scales that were impounded from traffickers and poachers.
Some of the stockpiles of confiscated ivory tusks in UWA stores

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The Parliamentary Committee on Tourism, Trade and Industry is drafting a report that will recommend the best practices in managing and disposing off wildlife exhibits seized from the black market. The Committee Chairperson, Kenneth Lubogo disclosed this during the committee visit to the Uganda Wildlife Authority-UWA headquarters.

 

During the visit, the committee members expressed dismay over the abuse and loss of high value wildlife products seized from traffickers from the custody of police and other law enforcement agencies. Oscar Omony, a member of the committee said there should be express modalities of disposing off such exhibits to eliminate their disappearance in thin air.

 

The Committee Chairperson, Kenneth Lubogo said they are drafting a report to parliament, which will make recommendations on the best practices in managing and disposing off wildlife exhibits. Currently, the UWA has over 8 tonnes of elephant tusks, rhino horns, and Pangolin scales that were impounded from traffickers and poachers.

 

 

Jossy Muhangi, the Senior Public Relations Officer, Uganda Wildlife Authority, says the stockpiles also include products recovered from animals that died of natural causes in the national game parks. He however, said UWA is still undecided on what to do with the stockpiles confiscated over the years.

 

 

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On April 30, 2016, Kenya, which introduced the world to burning ivory in 1989, burnt about 105 metric tons of ivory in 11 separately arranged bonfires in Nairobi National Park.  

The destruction of ivory is a technique used by governments and conservation groups to deter poaching of elephants for their tusks and to suppress the illegal ivory trade.