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Women Call For Improved Access To Information, Climate Change Financing :: Uganda Radionetwork
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Women Call For Improved Access To Information, Climate Change Financing

Participants suggested several strategies to improve information dissemination and financial access for women. These include community-based programs, using local languages in information campaigns, and increasing collaboration with women's groups. Additionally, they called for greater investment in gender-responsive climate initiatives that provide women with the tools and resources needed to lead climate action.

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Women are urging the government to enhance access to information and financial resources related to climate change, emphasizing their crucial role in environmental sustainability and resilience.

This call to action was highlighted during a Women in Climate Change Conference, where participants discussed the unique challenges women face in addressing climate impacts.

Florence Nakajubi, a student at Makerere University Business School, pointed out that while numerous initiatives and programs are designed to combat climate change, many potential beneficiaries, especially women remain unaware of these opportunities. According to her, this lack of awareness delays effective climate action and adaptation efforts.

"Interventions on climate change should target households, where women are the key drivers," said Nakajubi. "Many climate change initiatives, such as those on energy transitions, are unknown to them. There is a need to make this information accessible to women."

According to UN Environment, 80 percent of people displaced by climate change are women or girls, who face heightened risks of poverty, violence, and unintended pregnancies as they migrate to safer locations.

In Uganda, increasing levels of drought, livestock deaths, scarcity of traditional food sources, and water shortages have led to reduced crop production, loss of biodiversity, and reliance on solid fuels like firewood and charcoal for domestic use. These challenges disproportionately impact women.

Nakajubi adds that women need information to lead the way in adaptation and mitigation efforts, as they are currently underrepresented in these areas.

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The women in climate change Conference brought together experts, activists, and policymakers who highlighted the disproportionate impact of climate change on women, particularly in rural areas.

Participants suggested several strategies to improve information dissemination and financial access for women. These include community-based programs, using local languages in information campaigns, and increasing collaboration with women's groups. Additionally, they called for greater investment in gender-responsive climate initiatives that provide women with the tools and resources needed to lead climate action.

Margarete Atheino Mwebesa, the commissioner climate change at Ministry of Water and Environment, noted that Women’s roles in agriculture, water management, and household energy use make them critical players in climate adaptation and mitigation. However, pointed out many times the women are left out of the conversation yet women and girls are make the highest population on earth.

Sanne Willems, the Head of Sustainable Development at the European Union Delegation to Uganda, also emphasized the need to stop viewing women solely as victims of climate change, but rather as key agents of change who can make a significant impact if provided with the right information and financial support.

"On the climate change front, women can drive better change if they are given information and finances. Finance is critical, but many times banks are reluctant to issue loans to women's initiatives. Therefore, specific credit lines should be created to support women in battling climate change," she noted.

Beatrice Anywar, the State Minister for Environment, emphasized the pivotal role of innovation and financing for women-led and youth-led actions in a recent statement. She underscored the significance of focusing on these groups, citing their substantial representation within the population. Anywar stressed that empowering women and youth as leaders and entrepreneurs in the green economy could propel inclusive and equitable growth.

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Cue out... part of solutions.”// Evelyn Anite, the State Minister for Investment, highlighted that beyond providing information and financing, changing mindsets is crucial. To her, some people might struggle to adopt new adaptation and mitigation methods if their minds are not open to change.

She also pointed out that climate solutions are still relatively expensive and may deter people from abandoning their traditional practices. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the prices of these solutions to encourage widespread adoption.

//Cue in; “solar cooking... Cue out...three point five.”//For instance, at the conference, they showcased a solar electronic cooker seen as a game changer for many households still relying on wood fuel and charcoal, which contribute to deforestation. The current cost of deforestation was noted to be 1.8 million shillings, making it an expensive issue that many cannot afford to address.

Ruth Akiiki Komuntale Muwanguzi, Managing Director of ECOCA East Africa, explained that these technologies are costly due to several factors, including high taxes and the lack of local raw materials for manufacturing.

"Reducing taxes on our innovations would lower prices and make them accessible to households in both rural and urban settings," said Komuntale.

Minister Anite emphasized that taxes and incentives for SMEs and other investors in climate change solutions are critical issues. She noted that the government is committed to supporting them and has already provided incentives for Liquefied Petroleum Ga

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